Los Angeles Art Deco Hotels

The Georgian Hotel | Photo courtesy of Ken Shelton, Flickr

Art Deco was one of the most popular design styles of the early 20th century. Following on the heels of the Art Nouveau movement, it flourished in the period between WWI and WWII, and in many ways went hand-in-hand with the joie de vivre of the Jazz Age. Art Deco buildings are sleek in style, often painted in bright colors, with dramatic expressions and geometric motifs. Los Angeles is home to many fine examples of Art Deco, among them these five historic hotels.

Millennium Biltmore Rendezvous Court | Photo courtesy of David Wu, Flickr

Millennium Biltmore



The Millennium Biltmore opened in 1923 and was so popular in its early days that it was commonly referred to as “the Host of the Coast,” despite its Downtown location. Though the building itself is more of a blend of Renaissance Revival and Beaux Arts styles, the basement pool area is very much Deco-inspired, thanks to its ornate, original, hand-laid Italian tile work.

Hollywood Roosevelt lobby | Photo courtesy of demxx, Flickr

Hollywood Roosevelt



The Hollywood Roosevelt is another hotel that, though it was founded during the Art Deco era, favored a more traditional design scheme. In this case, it’s a rather dramatic Spanish Mission style - however, touches like the wrought-iron railings on the stairs are indeed Deco. While on the topic of design, we would be remiss not to mention the David Hockney-painted mural in the hotel’s pool - though it was added much later, it is still significant.

Georgian Hotel | photo courtesy of Ken Shelton, Flickr

Georgian Hotel



Opened in 1933, this beautiful, bright-blue hotel looks straight out of South Beach, but is distinctly Southern Californian, with the wavy pattern in the ironwork meant to mirror the Pacific Ocean that's just steps away. Aside from the vibrant hue, the hotel is basically rectangular in form, but certainly with distinct touches, such as the font of the hotel’s name and the moldings on the lower front of the building.