Rock

Rock

Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes., HUNNY's debut full-length album, opens on “Lula I’m Not Mad”—a bouncy pop track that matches its shimmery synth lines with hopelessly crushed-out lyrics.   Produced by Grammy Award-winner Carlos de la Garza (Cherry Glazerr, Culture Abuse, Paramore), Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. came to life in November 2018 during the Woolsey Fire and Camp Fire that devastated 96,949 acres of land in Southern California. At one point, while members Jason Yarger (vocals), Jake Goldstein (guitar), and Joey Anderson (drums) were inside Kevin Grimmett’s (bass, keyboards) home demoing and writing, firefighters were in the backyard stopping the wildfire from encroaching onto the property. “They blocked off all the streets and we had to sneak into my place through this apartment structure,” Grimmet recalls. “Thankfully my house is still standing and the hills are a bright green.”   Inspired by their love for ‘80s new wave and ‘90s pop, Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. is an endless back-and-forth between heavy-hearted lyrics and bright-and-shiny melodies, lovesick confession, and addictively dancey rhythms. With the album centered on a narrative Yarger sums up as “I love you and I want to die,” HUNNY wrote most of the songs on acoustic guitar, deliberately channeling a raw vulnerability into every line.   Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. embodies the wildly frenetic energy of HUNNY’s live show. As Grimmett explains, the band introduced that element with their ever-communal live show in mind. “We really love the emotive aspect of playing a show. For this record, we really took the time to think about what we were going to give them to sing, and made sure that it’s something with real feeling and meaning to it.”        
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Tame Impala is Kevin Parker -  the almost legendary messianic figure and creative soul who has developed the particular sonic universe of psychedelic pop cultivated with guitar pedals, delays, reverbs and liquid explosions of color. There’s no one like him in the current music scene. We were left in 2015 with Currents, Tame Impala's third album which ventured further into the pop genre, and added dance beats and R&B that only served to underpin the enthronement of the Australian. For his fourth album, Tame Impala remained true to his usual impenetrability and stands silent, but we have seen him parade through a number of collaborations: he has shared the studio with Mark Ronson and SZA, he has produced Lady Gaga and Travis Scott, Rihanna covered him on her latest album, he has remixed Mick Jagger and Miguel and has released songs with A$AP, Rocky, Theophilus London and ZHU. So what does all this mean? Well, we know what Tame Impala has been until now, but we haven’t a clue what will happen next. And that can only be a good thing.
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The band Real Estate have spent the last decade crafting warm yet meticulous pop-minded music, specializing in soaring melodies that are sentimentally evocative and unmistakably their own. They released their fourth and most recent album In Mind in early 2017, which was met with glowing reviews from media and fans alike, many of whom fell in love with the brilliantly melodic songwriting and rich lyricism of the band’s previous breakthrough record, Atlas (2014). Real Estate have played festival stages worldwide, including Coachella and Glastonbury, and the In Mind tour saw them play the largest rooms of their career, to fans eager to experience album highlights like singles “Darling” and “Stained Glass”. Real Estate have been hinting at a new release, with fans at recent 2019 shows being surprised with live versions of previously-unheard songs. It seems likely that 2020 will bring a fifth record from the beloved group, who excel at “deriving meaning from shimmering beauty” [NEW YORK TIMES].
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Galactic’s first new studio album in more than three years, ALREADY READY ALREADY – released on their own Tchuop-Zilla Records – sees the renowned New Orleans based instrumental outfit taking a distinctly contemporary approach towards their own progressive sound, interpolating modern rhythms and electronic instrumentation within the house-shaking framework of the Crescent City’s funk pop ‘n’ roll. Produced by the band’s Robert Mercurio and Ben Ellman, the new LP finds Galactic once again enlisting a diverse array of vocal collaborators to assist in their musical exploration, each of whom lend lyrical flavor and individualistic personality to the band’s multi-faceted sonic grooves. Bookended by a high powered pair of trademark Galactic instrumentals that give the album its title, ALREADY READY ALREADY. The album is a short, sharp blast of undeniable creative muscle, from the stripped down kick/snap verses of “Going Straight Crazy,” featuring New Orleans singer (and YouTube sensation) Princess Shaw, to punk cabaret artist Boyfriend’s quirky speed-rap on the breakneck “Dance At My Funeral.” As ever, Galactic’s omnivorous musical interests make easy classification utterly impossible – ALREADY READY ALREADY is as all encompassing and universal as the band’s moniker established long ago.     “I’ve never been able to put a label on what we do,” Ellman says. “I could say it’s funk or I could say it’s R&B or jazz or whatever else, but really, it’s all of that.”     “It’s not that we’re always trying to push boundaries,” says Mercurio, “but we definitely take influence from our hometown and try to do something new with it. We tour all around the world and we’re exposed to tons of elements that filter their way into our consciousness and come out through our music.”     Though their hearts are always in New Orleans, Galactic spends virtually all its life on the road, leaving limited timeframes in which to record. Whenever time allowed, the group holed up at their studio headquarters, Number C, where they were free to experiment and develop new ideas.     “Having our own studio allows to not be on some schedule,” Ellman says, “where we have to have material, save up some money, book the studio, and that’s the time we have to make a record. It’s a completely different process, where we can always be working on music.”     Over time, the tracks revealed themselves as either instrumentals (like the slippery, dub-inflected “Goose Grease”) or vocal songs. The band, so well woven into their city’s ever-changing music scene, began to thumb through their little black book in search of collaborators.     “Our community is so rich with talent,” Ellman says. “We’re just lucky to be in a situation where we can make phone calls, then someone comes to the studio, we kick it, start working on things. It’s all really organic.”     Galactic brought in a diverse array of predominantly young female singers, each of whom brings their own disparate musical tastes and cultural flavor. Working with artists lesser known on the national stage but beloved in their own community enables Galactic to evince a kind of sonic truth about their hometown, putting its multi-faceted underground to the fore.     “Trust me, I loved having Macy Gray and Mavis Staples on our last record,” Mercurio says. “It was an honor to work with them. But there’s something fun about making music with someone not everybody has heard of and end up getting a great reaction to it. There are no preconceived thoughts as to what the song should be like because the listener doesn’t know the artist as well.”     That being said, a number of the voices heard on ALREADY READY ALREADY are Galactic veterans: “Touch Get Cut” features the band’s touring vocalist, Erica Falls, while “Clap Your Hands” is sung by Ms. Charm Taylor, previously featured on 2015’s acclaimed INTO THE DEEP. The lilting “Everlasting Light” teams Galactic with frequent collaborator, The Revivalists’ David Shaw, alongside Nahko of Nahko & Medicine For The People – the only non-New Orleans resident among the features.     As for working with Nahko, Ellman says, “We just liked his vocal.” “Being from New Orleans isn’t a prerequisite for working with us. You never want to be restricted, it’s whatever serves the song best.”     Galactic is, likely even at this very moment, on the road as usual, with Erica Falls putting her own stamp on ALREADY READY ALREADY’s songs as they manifest new shapes through live performance. As if their perpetual tour schedule weren’t enough, Galactic announce the band’s purchase and future stewardship of New Orleans’ legendary Tipitina’s nightclub.     “We’re so incredibly honored to be tasked as the current caretakers of such a historic venue,” says Ellman. “My connection with the club started way before I was lucky enough to take the stage. My first job in New Orleans was at Tipitina’s as a cook in the (now defunct) kitchen. The importance of respecting what Tip’s means for musicians and the city of New Orleans is not lost on us. We’re excited for the future of the club and look forward to all the amazing music and good times ahead.”     With that in mind, it turns out that, despite the lack of released work, the past three years have in fact been remarkably prolific for Galactic. The sessions that yielded ALREADY READY ALREADY will generate still another LP, one which Ellman describes as “possibly more of a throwback thing” but will almost certainly morph into something altogether new and wonderful via Galactic’s evolutionary musical vision.     “There’s no telling what those songs will sound like when we’re through,” Mercurio says. “Once we get in there and start twisting them, see what perks up our ears, stuff can definitely take a left turn. That’s kind of the story of Galactic right there – we’re constantly taking left turns. I wonder what it would be like if we took a right…?”
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moe. is the preeminent progressive rock band on the music scene today. With 20 years of touring and just as many albums under its belt, the quintet of Al Schnier and Chuck Garvey on guitars and vocals, Rob Derhak on bass and vocals, Jim Loughlin on percussion and vibes, and Vinnie Amico on Drums, continues to push the standard for performance art.    Critical acclaim and a solid national and international fan base has built a dedicated following that grows each year. Whether touring across the globe, headlining music festivals, or sharing the stage with such celebrated acts as the Allmans, The Who, or Robert Plant, among others, what keeps moe. at the forefront of the music scene is not only the energy and vitality of their music and songwriting, but the showmanship in which it is delivered.    From its humble, inconspicuous beginnings as a local bar band in Buffalo in the late 1980s, to headlining Radio City Music Hall two year's straight on New Year's Eve, moe.'s journey has been one of hard work, perseverance, and dedication. Their music is clever, melodic, refined; their performances are  entertaining, mesmerizing and epic. There's a reason that Rolling Stone magazine placed Chuck and Al among the top twenty new "guitar gods," why the pair were featured in Guitar World and Modern Guitar; why Jim and Vinnie have been featured in Drum! magazine; why Rob in Bass Player and State of Mind magazines - all in the same year - because they're that good!    Critically acclaimed for its songwriting and studio work, the group's 2001 studio album, DITHER, was awarded four stars by Rolling Stone. 2003's WORMWOOD received four stars by Blender Magazine. Their two latest efforts, THE CONCH and STICKS & STONES, received rave reviews including Rolling Stone, Paste, and Blender magazine. In honor of their 20th Anniversary, the band released SMASH HITS, VOLUME 1. Billed as a "Young Person's Guide to moe.", the album features band and fan favorites – some recast in new recordings that showcase the band's ongoing evolution. "It's what we and others perceive as our strongest crowd pleasers of the past twenty years," Rob muses. "It's a compilation that you can listen to over and over again. Something your mother might enjoy."    The band continues to tour extensively: from San Fran to Amsterdam, from Tokyo to Toronto, from Chi Town to Bean Town, from Austin to Atlanta, playing and packing venues large and small, or intimate and grand. Long a featured act at music festivals, they have performed at Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo, Langerado, and Vegoose, to name a few; yet made time to promote and perform at their own festivals - Summer Camp, Snoe.down, and moe.down.    moe. was recently inducted into the Buffalo Music Hall of Fame, being recognized not only for the impact they have made in their hometown, but for their charitable work on a national and international level as well. The band hosted a Tsunami Benefit concert at the Roseland Ballroom in New York City on February 10, 2005 and raised $150,000 for Tsunami survivors. The concert earned moe. its second Live Performance of the Year Jammy Award. moe. also raised over $100,000 for various charities, including the Red Cross for Hurricane Katrina survivors and for the music department at Bradley Elementary in Utica, NY, to help keep music in children's lives.    moe. kicked off their 20th anniversary in style, hosting a two-night stand in New York City at Roseland Ballroom, which included a special benefit concert for WHY (World Hunger Year) http://www.whyhunger.org/. Throughout 2010, moe. continued to bring awareness to World Hunger and other issues, working with Headcount, Freedom for Burma, and many other charities.    By all accounts, for this "legendary jam band," as Rolling Stone magazine recently described them, it would be best to keep your eyes on this band and your ears tuned in to their music. Witness history in the making. This is welcome news for the moe. faithful and the band's ever-expanding fan base. Yet - even better news for the world of rock and roll - moe. has finally come into their own.
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A 23-year-old guitar phenom and innovative songwriter, Marcus King can simultaneously switch from swaggering rock to supersonic soul, having written songs and performing onstage for half his lifetime. All five members of the band—drummer Jack Ryan, bass player Stephen Campbell, trumpeter/trombonist Justin Johnson, sax player Dean Mitchell and the keyboard player —create a blistering, yet soulful unit that has honed their synergy through endless touring. Marcus started learning guitar at age three or four. He has played professionally since he was 11 and always knew he wanted to make music his life. A fourth-generation musician, Marcus has followed in his family’s footsteps. His grandfather was a country guitarist, and his father continues to perform live. From the start, Marcus earned rave reviews for his kinetic musicianship with The Washington Post describing him as a “guitar phenom” at age 20. Carolina Confessions, helmed by GRAMMY-Award winning producer Dave Cobb (Chris Stapleton, Sturgill Simpson), topped the Americana radio charts and received critical acclaim from the likes of VICE Noisey, NPR and Rolling Stone, who described him as an “electrifying rock performer.” Marcus also recently embarked on a string of dates with Chris Stapleton, who called him “one of his favorite artists” when he recently joined him onstage. Marcus King continues to re-write his fast moving and surprising story. You can hear change in the wisdom of his lyrics and deeply soulful vocals, bringing sheer musical command to every performance.
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“Choir Boy” was what the kids called singer/songwriter Adam Klopp in his early teens when he fronted punk cover bands in Cleveland, Ohio.  An intended insult, the label seemed fair and fitting in a way, given Klopp’s religious upbringing and angelic voice. After high school, Adam left Ohio for college in Utah. While his career as a student would prove short-lived, he integrated into Provo and SLC’s underground music and art scene, left religion behind, and called his new band “Choir Boy”.“It seemed funny to me as sort of a comical reclamation of the mocking title I received from “punk” peers as a teen. While serving as a weird reflection of my childhood and musical heritage.” Since Choir Boy’s gorgeous debut LP on Team Love records in 2016, the dream-pop outfit has gained a cult following online and in underground circles.  Adam’s stunning vocal range, layered compositions, and heartbreaking melodies are backed by musical partner Chaz Costello on bass (Fossil Arms, Sculpture Club, Human Leather) - and along with a rotating cast of players, create the perfect blend of nostalgia-laced romantic pop music we’ve been waiting years to hear
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Tame Impala is Kevin Parker -  the almost legendary messianic figure and creative soul who has developed the particular sonic universe of psychedelic pop cultivated with guitar pedals, delays, reverbs and liquid explosions of color. There’s no one like him in the current music scene. We were left in 2015 with Currents, Tame Impala's third album which ventured further into the pop genre, and added dance beats and R&B that only served to underpin the enthronement of the Australian. For his fourth album, Tame Impala remained true to his usual impenetrability and stands silent, but we have seen him parade through a number of collaborations: he has shared the studio with Mark Ronson and SZA, he has produced Lady Gaga and Travis Scott, Rihanna covered him on her latest album, he has remixed Mick Jagger and Miguel and has released songs with A$AP, Rocky, Theophilus London and ZHU. So what does all this mean? Well, we know what Tame Impala has been until now, but we haven’t a clue what will happen next. And that can only be a good thing.
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