Pop

Pop

Harry Styles: Love On Tour
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Harry Styles: Love On Tour
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Every online ticket purchased for this show includes one CD copy of Camila Cabello’s new album, Romance (available December 6, 2019). You will receive an email with more details about this offer approximately 7 days after your purchase. US/Canadian residents only. Offer not valid on resale tickets.   Children age 3 and older require a ticket. A child under the age of 3 is considered a lap child and does not require a ticket. Tickets will go on-sale through AXS.com or over the phone with AXS at (213) 457-1647 on the first day of the on-sale. The Box Office at STAPLES Center will sell starting the next business day. Will Call is available at our venue 2 hours before the start of the event on the day of the show only. VALID PHOTO ID AND THE CREDIT CARD USED TO PURCHASE ARE REQUIRED TO PICK UP ALL WILL CALL TICKETS. Visit www.staplescenter.com for more information.
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ABBA tribute The ABBA Show
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I never learned how to swim.             In years of sailing, I never let the water touch me. The ocean was an abstract dread, an obliterating void as untenable as outer space.             In January 2018 we went on tour. After years of scraping by, we found our footing with our fourth record Yours Conditionally. It was a commercial success that set us up to to play the biggest rooms of our career. But three shows in, I developed a raging case of influenza. Each night I dragged myself onstage and croaked out the set in a delirium. After a particularly bad soundcheck, Patrick asked me if we should cancel the show. I couldn’t imagine giving up the thing we’d work so hard to achieve. “I’ll be on stage even if you have to mic my coffin,” I joked.             The next morning I fainted and had a seizure while grocery shopping for breakfast. Patrick carried me through the check-out lanes screaming for a doctor. I woke later in a hospital bed. Patrick leaned over me, crying. “That’s it,” he said. “I’m canceling the tour. I thought you were dead. We’re quitting the band. I’m going to be an accountant.” But I was on the mend. We missed two shows and pressed on.             During sound check at the 930 club, Patrick stepped out to take a phone call. His father had been in the hospital all week, but he had cancer and brief hospitalizations were routine. Back at the hotel that night, Patrick poured two shots of whiskey and handed me one. “I’d like to toast my dad.” He said. “The doctors offered to put him on life-support to give me a chance to fly out there, but I didn’t want him to suffer. Instead I said goodbye.”             Patrick went home to grieve with his family and rejoined us on the road two days later. I couldn’t believe how quickly our lives had unraveled in the midst of what was supposed to be a milestone in our career. As the tour continued, we found refuge in playing music together. Songwriting had always been an extension of our inner-world. Now we retreated to that world every time we stepped onstage.        After the final show of our tour in Austin, we received another phone call. Patrick’s mother Karen was in the hospital on the brink of a stroke. We got on a plane and went straight to her bedside. Her recovery took weeks. In the hospital waiting room, I wrote the opening line of “Matrimony II”: I only have certainty when you hold my hand.       On a hot July day, after Karen’s return to good health, we sailed as a family into the Pacific and scattered Edward’s ashes at sea. I marked our position on the chart with a small x. The album was already well under way. In that moment, I realized what I wanted to call it.       Swimmer is a tour of the darkest time in our lives. But it is not a dark record. Named for the feeling of suspension and upendedness that characterized this period, it is the story  of deep-rooted companionship strengthened by pain and loss. These songs carried us through our grief. It is us at our most vulnerable, so we kept a small footprint, recording everything ourselves in our home studio. I set out to describe the love I have come to know after ten years of marriage, when you can no longer remember your life before that person, when the spark of early attraction has been replaced by a gravitational pull.   Swimmer is available everywhere February 14, 2020.
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This show is GA partially seated; first come first served. Arrive to the venue early to secure a seat.
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Ali Gatie knows the way to your heart is through your ears.   Over the course of 2018, the 22 year old singer-songwriter from the Toronto suburb of Mississauga self-released a string of projects that took him from square one of his career to a global fan base, racking up millions of streams of unexpected hits like the acoustic-tinged ballad “Moonlight.” In the process he revealed himself to have not only the single-minded focus and work ethic of a 21st century hustler but the heart of a classic songsmith. The numbers are impressive (over 13 million streams of “Moonlight” on Spotify–with nearly 15 million views of its lyric video on YouTube–and two other singles breaking 5 million streams), especially when you consider that he did it all himself, without any professional support or industry connections. You can credit some of that success to Ali’s social media hustle–he once responded to over 2000 fan messages on Snapchat in a single day. But numbers only tell part of the story. It’s nothing special to rack up millions of viewer impressions with social media stunts, but Ali’s looking beyond that kind of shallow, fleeting fame. He’s building something deeper with his fans, based on timeless ideas.   Ali doesn’t shy away from writing about the big subjects that have always consumed great artists, concepts like love and devotion that many young artists these days shy away from. His sound mines the fertile area where R&B and contemporary pop overlap–although from a brighter side of the spectrum than you might associate with crooners from the 6–but it’s delivered with openness and honesty, mixing the timeless songwriting of contemporary icons like Ed Sheeran with the next-generation sounds of Post Malone, Juice Wrld, and Charlie Puth.   Some of Ali’s ability to find common ground with any listener he comes across must have something to do with how much of the world he’s seen, starting from a young age. Ali was born in Yemen to Iraqi parents, then spent part of his childhood in Dubai before his family moved to the culturally and economically diverse city of Mississauga. And certainly a lot of it comes from the way he was brought up–he credits a lot of his music-making philosophy to the traditional Arab values of hospitality and generosity that his parents raised him with.   But Ali’s also just a natural-born relationship builder. Musically, he’s the kind of performer who makes everyone who hears him feel like they’re the only person he’s singing to. He’s the type of creator who understands the power of an intimate gesture like a musician singing along to his own song in the car (a clip that helped drive “Moonlight” to its breakthrough), or the way viewers can’t help but get caught up in the first-person love story of his “Can’t Lie” video. At a time where the pop landscape seems more splintered than ever, Ali Gatie is dreaming big and making music the whole world can love.
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Tove Lo - Sunshine Kitty Tour
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Tori Kelly: Inspired by True Events Tour
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Talent line-up includes: Cyndi Lauper, Kesha, King Princess, Brandi Carlile, Belinda Carlile, Billy Porter, Henry Rollins, Lily Tomlin, Margaret Cho, Perry Farrell with Etty Lau Farrell, Carol Leifer, Charlie Musselwhite, Emily Estefan, Gina Yashere, Justin Tranter, K. Flay, Shawn Wasabi and Hosted By Carson Kressley   Talent line-up is subject to change and is not grounds for refunds.
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