Musso & Frank Grill: The Story of An LA Icon

The Martinis are as legendary as the stars that have dined at Musso's

The bar at Musso & Frank Grill | Photo: Yuri Hasegawa

The bar at Musso & Frank Grill | Photo: Yuri Hasegawa


Mark Echeverria, the COO, CFO and proprietor of Musso & Frank Grill, shares a story that has become part of the lore of the Hollywood landmark, which is celebrating its centennial in 2019. Back in the early days of Musso & Frank, Charlie Chaplin would come here with his colleagues. To get to the restaurant, they would race down Hollywood Boulevard by horse and the loser would pick up the tab for lunch. As they ate, they kept an eye on the horses from the only booth with a window view. "It's still known as the Charlie Chaplin booth," says Echeverria by phone, "and it's still, by far, the most-requested booth that we have."

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Photo courtesy of Musso & Frank Grill

Joseph Musso and Frank Toulet opened their namesake restaurant on Sept. 27, 1919. They hired French chef Jean Rue, who would helm the kitchen for 53 years. In 1927, Musso and Toulet sold their restaurant to two Italian immigrants, John Mosso and Joseph Carrissimi. Today, Musso's is owned and operated by the third and fourth generations of the Mosso family - Echeverria is Mosso's great-grandson.

The surrounding neighborhood has changed a lot since 1919. For starters, Hollywood Boulevard is no longer conducive to horse racing. But for 100 years, this steakhouse has remained a constant, low-key fixture on a street that's in a continuous state of hustle and bustle. Outside, the latest tunes blast from cars and sidewalk cafes as street performers try to catch your attention and trendy t-shirts pour out of souvenir shops. Inside, dark wood booths come with coat hangers on the side, a rarity in warm and casual Los Angeles. A bartender in a red jacket makes change at a register that looks as if it long pre-dates the digital age.

Grenadine of Beef at Musso & Frank Grill

Grenadine of Beef at Musso & Frank Grill | Photo: West Coast Prime Meats

Even the menu hasn't been drastically altered over the years. "We've done a few little tweaks to the menu," says Echeverria, "All those tweaks are to bring the recipes and the food to a modern-day palate… In 1919, the recipes that we have are rather bland by today's tastes." Their current executive chef, J.P. Amateau is only the third person to hold that position in the restaurant's history. He's also a local who used to frequent the restaurant as a child. "J.P. has really been able to walk an extremely fine line and do it extremely successfully," says Echeverria.

The most ordered item here is filet mignon, cooked over an open-fire mesquite grill that has been seasoned for more than 30 years. Also popular is the Grenadine of Beef, which has been on the menu since the early 1920s. "We've got regulars that have been coming in for 40 years that have never tried anything else," says Echeverria.

Classic Martini at Musso & Frank Grill

Classic Martini at Musso & Frank Grill

 |  Photo: Daniel Djang

On the cocktail side, the restaurant is famed for their Martini (named one of the 20 best cocktails in America by GQ), which is stirred and served with a sidecar on chilled ice.

Counter seats in the Old Room at Musso & Frank Grill

Counter seats in the Old Room | Photo by Tina Whatcott, Musso & Frank Grill

Echeverria, who grew up in Northern California, remembers traveling to LA at least once a month and visiting the restaurant when his grandmother was running the show. In 2009, he took over the day-to-day duties and was impressed with how much of the clientele is local. Not only are the diners here mostly Angelenos, they are quite often regulars. "It shocked me to know how many regulars we have and how little of the tourist business we do," says Echeverria. "It's not that they don't want to come, it's just that they have a hard time finding a table because our regulars are sitting in them." He adds that, ordinarily, people can book tables for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays "a couple days in advance." Otherwise, you might want to call for reservations weeks before your date. As for the holidays, Musso's gets packed fast - Valentine's Day can be booked two months in advance.

Musso & Frank's reputation was sealed during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Over the years, they've served Hollywood royalty and literary titans, everyone from Marilyn Monroe and Humphrey Bogart to F. Scott Fitzgerald and Charles Bukowski. While Echeverria will discuss the past, he's not one to reveal the restaurant's current celebrity clientele. Discretion is key here.

Musso & Frank Grill in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Al Pacino at Musso & Frank Grill in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood | Photo: Andrew Cooper, Columbia Pictures

A star in its own right, Musso's has appeared in numerous films and TV shows, including Ed Wood, Swingers, Ocean's Eleven (2001), Mad Men, Bosch, and most recently in Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.

“We’ve never been busier and in fact this past year was our best ever.” - Mark Echeverria, May 2019

As Musso & Frank looks back on its first 100 years, it's also looking ahead to its future. In May 2019, Musso's announced that construction had begun on three new private dining rooms with special access entrances. "The new rooms will have an Old School Hollywood feel," says Echeverria. "When you are in them, you will feel like they have been there since the opening of our ‘New Room’ back in 1955."

Echeverria says that the restaurant's motto is, "We treat locals like celebrities and celebrities like locals," and shares a story to that point. A few years ago, Echeverria was at the front of the restaurant with a server who had been with the restaurant for more than 50 years. When a customer asked who the server's favorite guest was, he replied, "I've served tens of thousands of customers throughout the years and everyone was special."

Musso & Frank Grill
6667 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 90028
323.467.7788
www.mussoandfrank.com

NOTE: Musso's will be closed the week of September 22 for centennial celebrations and reopening for regular service on October 1.