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THE COMO LA FLOR BAND was founded in 2011 in the small town of Holtville, Ca. After 7 years, THE COMO LA FLOR BAND has become the most respected and trend setter Selena tribute band in the nation. THE COMO LA FLOR BAND replicates the look, sound and feel of the Tex-Mex queen. The eight band members have developed an amazing on-stage chemistry. These veteran musicians pride themselves on giving their audience an incredible high-energy, qualitative stage show from start to finish. Our lead vocalist has an amazing singing voice flawlessly matching SelenaQuintanilla´s vocal range and on-stage movements, exactly. Dedicated to the loyal fans, the band has worked hard and with the upmost humbleness and respect to bring the Selena experience with so much detail. Our singers visual demeanor is uncanny to the Tex-Mex Queen. THE COMO LA FLOR BAND brings to you the last concert Selena performed in Houston, Tx., and also highlights the early Selena years.
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Stick your head out the window and sniff the air: there’s a blizzard of badness brewing, and it’s not blowing over anytime soon. Sure, the political leaders, bullies, and other villains of various venoms are dominating the headlines, but these days the list of troublemakers extends well beyond the usual suspects. From their home base in the Heartland, Tulsa, Oklahoma’s BRONCHO have a unique vantage point from which to survey the sins. Churning out thoughtful, nuanced rock and roll with an art school spirit and a punk rock heart since 2010, the band’s fourth album, Bad Behavior, finds them leaning into their strengths for their strongest effort yet. Following the catchy, playful vibe of previous albums Can’t Get Past the Lips (2011) and Just Enough Hip to Be Woman (2014), as well as the deliberate sonic intent of 2016’s sludgy, moodier art piece Double Vanity, the new record reveals BRONCHO’s fly-on-the-crumbling-wall vision of our moral climate, complete with a reenergized, accessible sound and the charmingly sardonic, smiling-while-sneering delivery of singer and bandleader Ryan Lindsey. “It’s a reflection of the current world: everybody’s been acting badly over the last few years so we made a record about it,” Lindsey says. “There are multiple ways of portraying something as ‘bad,’ and there are moments of self- reflection throughout the record as though we could be talking about ourselves—but not necessarily. It’s observational, like we’re looking through muddy binoculars from a distance. It’s a blurry mirror image of the times from where we sit.” Lindsey (vocals/guitar) and the band—Nathan Price (drums), Ben King (guitar), and Penny Pitchlynn (bass)—are a tight unit who have seen their songs featured at influential TV and radio and have toured the U.S. and Europe, including arenas with the likes of Queens of the Stone Age, The Growlers, Portugal.The Man, and Cage The Elephant. In the gritty warehouse district of Downtown Tulsa they have carved out a physical place for themselves, an industrial blank space where BRONCHO can experiment with sounds, performance, visuals, and more. It’s where they recorded Bad Behavior with producer Chad Copelin in the first half of 2018, a controlled process that allowed them to work at their own pace and by their own standards, almost like a secret club. Bad Behavior slinks and purrs with a sense of lascivious flirtation. Lindsey sings with a mischievous twinkle in his voice, peppering his verses with suggestive uh-ohs and ahhs and at times barely pushing out his words to the point of whispering. Lines like “You caught me in the weekend/You caught me with your boyfriend” (“Weekend”) and “I got a thing for your mother/I got a thing to teach your father” (“Family Values”) match the primal pulse of the songs’ moods and vibes, and their pop sensibilities create a world where T. Rex, Tom Petty, The Cars, and The Strokes collide. “Keep It in Line” chimes along to a driving, pepped-up beat and serves as both the album’s catchiest moment and its closest swerve toward ethical commentary, as Lindsey’s narrator demands to be reminded of his place in the world while attempting to submit to his misgivings. The result is less an act of penance and more of honest reproach, an ultimate judgment that is matched in its directness only by the following track, “Sandman,” an overt yearning for pleasure that Lindsey calls the band’s answer to The Chordettes classic “Mr. Sandman.” The record is filled with references to religion, sin, drugs, vice, and scandal bubbling just under the surface. It’s a palette familiar to anyone who has ever turned on the evening news, which Lindsey admits was a huge influence on him. “Through the writing process I watched a lot of CNN, and man there’s a lot of bad behavior there,” he says. “Not to mention that there’s a company making money off of people watching their depiction of it all. From an entertainer’s standpoint I get what they’re doing, calling everything ‘breaking news’ and keeping people glued, but taking up that kind of space can’t be good for society. Although it’s pretty fun to watch.” Can all this unsavory activity exist without taking sides? Lindsey holds tight to his role as a relayer and is comfortable with leaving it to the audience to cast their own lot. “We’re assuming that everybody is coming from a certain set of values, but ultimately that’s impossible,” he says. “There’s a lot of people who think a certain way about the world and aren’t as shocked by these things. Maybe we’re simply trying to start the conversation. The best news is just a report of what’s going on, without bias. This record is a non-biased, non-profit reporting on what’s going on in the world. Part of it’s an exploration in solving those problems, on a personal level and ultimately on a cultural level.” Bad Behavior represents a picture of a band that have crushed their own commercial expectations and are doing what they want to do at their own pace. They’ve cleaned the slate and quietly made a return with urgent, bonafide pop songs. If you want to catch a whiff of Bad Behavior, simply stick your head out the window and breathe.
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The second full-length album from Australian singer/songwriter Julia Jacklin, Crushingembodies every possible meaning of its title word. It’s an album formed from sheer intensity of feeling, an in-the-moment narrative of heartbreak and infatuation. And with her storytelling centered on bodies and crossed boundaries and smothering closeness, Crushingreveals how our physical experience of the world shapes and sometimes distorts our inner lives. “This album came from spending two years touring and being in a relationship, and feeling like I never had any space of my own,” says the Melbourne-based artist. “For a long time I felt like my head was full of fear and my body was just this functional thing that carried me from point A to B, and writing these songs was like rejoining the two.” The follow-up to her 2016 debut Don’t Let the Kids Win, Crushingfinds Jacklin continually acknowledging what’s expected of her, then gracefully rejecting those expectations. As a result, the album invites self-examination and a possible shift in the listener’s way of getting around the world—an effect that has everything to do with Jacklin’s openness about her own experience. “I used to be so worried about seeming demanding that I’d put up with anything, which I think is common—you want to be chill and cool, but it ends up taking so much of your emotional energy,” says Jacklin. “Now I’ve gotten used to calling out things I’m not okay with, instead of just burying my feelings to make it easier on everyone. I’ve realized that in order to keep the peace, you have to speak up for yourself and say what you really want.” Produced by Burke Reid (Courtney Barnett, The Drones) and recorded at The Grove Studios (a bushland hideaway built by INXS’ Garry Gary Beers), Crushingsets Jacklin’s understated defiance against a raw yet luminous sonic backdrop. “In all the songs, you can hear every sound from every instrument; you can hear my throat and hear me breathing,” she says. “It was really important to me that you can hear everything for the whole record, without any studio tricks getting in the way.” On the album-opening lead single “Body,” Jacklin proves the power of that approach, turning out a mesmerizing vocal performance even as she slips into the slightest murmur. A starkly composed portrait of a breakup, the song bears an often-bracing intimacy, a sense that you’re right in the room with Jacklin as she lays her heart out. And as “Body” wanders and drifts, Jacklin establishes Crushing as an album that exists entirely on its own time, a work that’s willfully unhurried. From there, Crushingshifts into the slow-building urgency of “Head Alone,” a pointed and electrifying anthem of refusal (sample lyric: “I don’t want to be touched all the time/I raised my body up to be mine”).“As a woman, in my case as a touring musician, the way you’re touched is different from your male bandmates—by strangers and by those close to you,” notes Jacklin. On the full-tilt, harmony-spiked “Pressure to Party,” she pushes toward another form of emotional freedom. “When you come out of a relationship, there’s so much pressure to act a certain way,” says Jacklin. “First it’s like, ‘Oh, you’ve gotta take some time for yourself’...but then if you take too much time it’s, ‘You’ve gotta get back out there!’ That song is just my three-minute scream, saying I’m going to do what I need to do, when I need to do it.” Crushingalso shows Jacklin’s autonomy on songs like “Convention,” an eye-rolling dismissal of unsolicited advice, presented in elegantly sardonic lyrics (“I can tell you won’t sleep well, if you don’t teach me how to do it right”). Elsewhere on Crushing,Jacklin brings her exacting reflection to songs on loss. With its transportive harmonies and slow-burning guitar solo, “Don’t Know How to Keep Loving You” ponders the heartache in fading affection (“I want your mother to stay friends with mine/I want this feeling to pass in time”). Meanwhile, on “Turn Me Down”—an idiosyncratically arranged track embedded with hypnotic guitar tones—Jacklin gives an exquisitely painful glimpse at unrequited devotion (“He took my hand, said I see a bright future/I’m just not sure that you’re in it”). “That song destroyed me in the studio,” says Jacklin of “Turn Me Down,” whose middle section contains a particularly devastating vocal performance. “I remember lying on the floor in a total state between what felt like endless takes, and if you listen it kind of sounds like I’m losing my mind.” And on “When the Family Flies In,” Jacklin shares her first ever piano-driven piece, a beautifully muted elegy for the same friend to whom she dedicated Don’t Let the Kids Win. “There are really no words to do justice to what it feels like to lose a friend,” says Jacklin. “It felt a bit cheap to even try to write a song about it, but this one came out on tour and it finally felt okay to record. Despite its complexity, Crushingunfolds with an ease that echoes Jacklin’s newfound self-reliance as an artist. Originally from the Blue Mountains, she grew up on her parents’ Billy Bragg and Doris Day records and sang in musicals as a child, then started writing her own songs in her early 20s. “With the first album I was so nervous and didn’t quite see myself as a musician yet, but after touring for two years, I’ve come to feel like I deserve to be in that space,” she says. Throughout Crushing,that sense of confidence manifests in one of the most essential elements of the album: the captivating strength of Jacklin’s lyrics. Not only proof of her ingenuity and artistic generosity, Jacklin’s uncompromising specificity and infinitely unpredictable turns of phrase ultimately spring from a certain self-possession in the songwriting process. “As I was making this album there was sort of a slow loosening of pressure on myself,” Jacklin says. “There’ve been some big life changes for me over the last few years, and I just found it too tiring to try to cover things up with a lot of metaphors and word trickery. I just wanted to lay it all out there and trust that, especially at such a tense moment in time, other people might want to hear a little vulnerability.”
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Great artistry has the ability to adapt to its environment while never sacrificing an authentic creative vision. Nothing more true can be said of producer, singer, songwriter, Peder Losnegård, a.k.a Lido. Over the last five years, the multi-instrumentalist and virtuoso has fearlessly carved out his own creative stamp across multiple genres within the musical landscape.  He’s produced and remixed some of the most innovative music of the last decade with some critically acclaimed chart-topping heavyweights including, Chance The Rapper, Ella Mai, Banks, Alt-J, Bastille, Halsey and Disclosure to name a few.  His solo releases include 2016’s critically praised album, ‘Everything,’ as well as his now infamous 8-minute re-imagining of Kanye West’s ‘Life of Pablo,’ appropriately titled ‘Life of Peder.’ In recent years, Lido produced tracks for Chicago rapper Towkio including his breakout single “Symphony,” which the two performed last February on the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. Followed by the release of the EP ‘Spacesuit’ with buzzing Seattle rapper J’von. He followed up ‘Life of Peder’ with the highly acclaimed 7-minute project ‘kidsloveghosts,” a re-imagining of Kanye West and Kid Cudi’s latest collaboration ‘Kids See Ghosts,’ hailed by Dancing Astronaut as “stunning” and “masterful.”  Entirely self-taught, Lido quickly became a piano prodigy while also excelling on the drums.  He got to grips with production at the age of ten which allowed him to develop his own unique production style from an early age.  It was through a series of remixes that Lido eventually catapulted into the sets of the most high-profile DJ’s around the globe, capturing the ears of numerous notable tastemakers. Reworking acts like Portugal. The Man and Bill Withers, Lido became an internet sensation, eventually getting signed to record label Pelican Fly/Because Music.  Debuting on the label with 2014’s ‘I Love You’ EP, followed by the ‘Superspeed’ EP, and remixes of Banks, Alt-J and MØ, Lido’s anti-formulaic style emerged.    2019 has already seen production releases from Lido including “Get A Bag” on Chance The Rappers debut album along with opening up Jaden Smith’s album “SYRE” in a 4 part song featuring Lido on the last track. His compositions bounce from one idea to another voraciously, but always with that clear Lido stamp. You don’t just get a drum and a bassline; you’re more likely to get an entire string or brass section that elevates the sound to cinematic heights. Lido’s sophomore album is set to release in early 2020, which encapsulates everything he ever was and has become up to this point in his career. Developing a new genre yet again, Lido’s Galactic R&B toys with a new breed of genre equality that infuses new sounds and garners reactions never before felt.
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When Moon Boots hits the booth, he’s got one mission: to give you the best night of your life. Whether playing at iconic clubs like Chicago’s Smart Bar — where he cut his teeth watching legends like Frankie Knuckles and Derrick Carter — or the world’s biggest festival stages, he gives people a release they’ll remember long after the party’s over. Born in Brooklyn, Moon Boots’ (birth name: Pete Dougherty) musical obsession started not long after he could walk. His early love of piano lead to a passion for keyboards and synthesizers. Teenage nights lost in the work of Daft Punk, A Tribe Called Quest and Herbie Hancock followed. Then came college years at Princeton University, where he shelved an Engineering degree to dive into the musical abyss. Knowing what he was meant to do, he moved to the house music epicenter of Chicago, where he tirelessly passed out demos to local DJs and scoured the web for like-minded people with whom he could share and expand on his sound. He played in a synth-pop trio whose demo caught the attention of Lupe Fiasco, and after a stint touring alongside the hip-hop icon, Dougherty went back to DJing with a renewed focus. The stars aligned when he had a chance encounter with Perseus, founder of an adventurous new label, French Express. A fellow junkie and fan of French House and R&B-infused dance music, Perseus became a friend and mentor, the Splinter to Boots' Donatello. The label eventually disbanded but Boots has stayed true to his mission of making dance tracks that can’t be confined to one style. Pete blends the music he loves -- jazz, house, funk and soul -- into songs that last longer than their runtime. Songs not just for DJs, but for everyone.After moving back to Brooklyn, Dougherty was introduced to the beloved Anjunadeep crew. His relationship with the label and their artists has flourished, leading to his debut album First Landing (out August 4th.) It’s an album where cavernous club music meshes with classical melodies, warm harmonies, and bright and beloved melodic soundscapes riddled with soul.
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The love for Li Jian comes from the sincere emotions stemming from his singing and his careless of fame and fortune.Those who have had the pleasure of listening to Li Jian’s concert will be full of praise for his live performance. His live is melodious, fabulous, and interesting. The layout of the scene, whether the lighting or stage design, is humanized. Li Jian’s clear voice, friendly temperament, his smile while signing and the talking after songs, feels like the interaction between good old friends.The inspiration for "Keep On Li Jian" inspired by an interview entitled "Li Jian, that is, Li Jian". Li Jian believes that the meaning of the concert should be present a rare aspect of the singer from the arrangement of the songs, the performance of the pieces, and more vividly communication with the audience.With “Keep On Li Jian”, Li Jian especially looks forward to this fresh and unique perspective to recreate the unexpected music world.
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The NoSleep Podcast will be bringing its live show across America for the haunted Halloween season. Join David Cummings, Jessica McEvoy, David Ault, and Nichole Goodnight as they perform Halloween tales accompanied by a live score performed by Brandon Boone. The show features stories never before heard on the podcast. With a full musical score and immersive sound effects, the NoSleep team will transport you into the terror which lurks within every Halloween night. Running 110 minutes the show will feature frights and fun with lots of tricks and treats for everyone. Brace yourself - The NoSleep Podcast and Halloween – a match made in hell.
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Bringing together all forms of progressive music, Soulection is an independent music platform, radio show, and artist collective that was founded in Los Angeles in 2011. By consistently bringing visibility to meaningful music and curating memorable experiences, Soulection has broadcast it’s vision and created a culture that brings together hundreds of thousands of supporters worldwide.   Soulection, music’s most diverse artist collective, radio show and music platform, brings its progressive artist roster on a national tour, The Sound of Tomorrow. These artists are known to curate vibes - memorable nights that elevate shows into experiences. The line-up for this tour includes Joe Kay, Andre Power, Arin Ray, ESTA, Sango, The Whooligan, LAKIM, Monte Booker, Hablot Brown, Malia, Sahar Habibi, Kronika, Naji, Devin Tracy, J. Robb, Jared Jackson, Andres Uribe, AbJo and more. Artists vary by date. VIP packages will be available tomorrow on primary ticketing. Local presales begin Thursday, June 28 at 10:00 AM and run until 10:00 PM. General admission tickets go on sale Friday, June 29 at 10:00 AM local time. See below for the complete list of tour dates: Thursday, September 20, 2018 Calgary, AB Commonwealth StageFriday, September 21, 2018 Vancouver, BC The Commodore BallroomSaturday, September 22, 2018 Edmonton, AB Chvrch of JohnThursday, September 27, 2018 Los Angeles, CA The Fonda TheatreFriday, September 28, 2018 San Francisco, CA The Regency BallroomSaturday, September 29, 2018 Santa Ana, CA The ObservatoryThursday, October 11, 2018 Atlanta, GA Variety PlayhouseFriday, October 12, 2018 New Orleans, LA Republic NOLASaturday, October 13, 2018 Englewood, CO Gothic TheatreWednesday, October 24, 2018 Detroit, MI El ClubThursday, October 25, 2018 Chicago, IL Concord Music HallFriday, October 26, 2018 Toronto, ON Danforth Music HallSunday, October 28, 2018 Philadelphia, PA Union TransferWednesday, October 31, 2018 Boston, MA The SinclairThursday, November 01, 2018 Washington, DC 9:30 ClubWednesday, November 07, 2018 San Antonio, TX Paper TigerThursday, November 08, 2018 Las Vegas, NV Brooklyn BowlFriday, November 09, 2018 Phoenix, AZ Crescent BallroomSaturday, November 10, 2018 Seattle, WA The Showbox For more, please visit:https://soulection.com/https://www.facebook.com/Soulection/ www.twitter.com/soulectionhttps://www.instagram.com/soulection/
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