FIGFest with Oddisee & Good Compny, Sudan Archives

FIGFest with Sudan Archives
FREE    |  Jul 14, 2019  |  6:00PM - 11:00PM

Downtown LA’s free annual summer music festival FIGFest—an important stop on the launch pad of top artists including The Internet and Anderson .Paak—returns to FIGat7th to energize the city this June with fun summer nights and eclectic sounds. In partnership with Spaceland Presents, LA’s leading concert promotion firm, the festival kicks off June 7 and runs four consecutive Friday nights at Downtown LA’s premier shopping destination, FIGat7th.

The plaza at FIGat7th will be transformed into DTLA’s outdoor stage brought to life with performances by leading R&B, hip-hop, pop, soul, dance, and electronic artists. Kicking off the series is LA’s very own explosive and honest rock act Cherry Glazerr (June 7), followed by the inspired and infectious hip-hop soul of rapper and live band Oddisee & Good Compny (June 14), then the sensual fusion of funk, pop, Latin, and electronic sounds by experimental duo Buscabulla (June 21) and concluding with the energetic and playful, synth- infused, indie-electronic-rock of STRFKR (June 28).

Each Friday, the bar opens and a DJ kicks off the night at 6:00pm, followed by a 7:00pm opener, 8:00pm DJ set, 8:30pm headliner, and wrapping the night with a 10:00pm DJ set. Make sure to grab dinner, drinks and snacks before the show at TASTE Food Hall on FIGat7th’s lower level.

FIGFest’s unique lineup reflects the vibrant cultural center that Downtown LA has become. Past festivals have featured The Internet, Superhumanoids, Soulection, Wavves, Tuxedo, Hanni El Khatib, Poolside, and Anderson .Paak. FIGFest is one of the only free concert experiences open to the public in Los Angeles where music lovers can dine, drink, and shop all in one spot.

ABOUT ODDISEE & GOOD COMPNY

Prolific hip-hop artist Oddisee first became known as an underground producer before gaining respect as a rapper. His literate, relatable lyrics tackle personal issues and political themes, and his productions encompass retro-soul, go-go, and gospel influences. Born in Washington, D.C. to a Sudanese father and an African-American mother, Amir Mohamed grew up in Maryland, influenced by soul and rap as well as myriad musicians on both sides of his family. He was set to attend the Art Institute of Philadelphia to pursue visual arts when a friend introduced him to hip-hop production.

Part of the Low Budget crew, which included fellow D.C.-area MCs and producers Kenn StarrCy Young, and Kev BrownOddisee released his solo debut, Foot in the Door (mixed by Jazzy Jeff), on Halftooth in 2006. He signed to Mello Music Group in 2008, debuting with Mental Liberation and New Money (a collaboration with Trek Life) in 2009. He also formed the trio Diamond District along with labelmates XO and yU; their debut, In the Ruff, also appeared in 2009. He typically released one or two solo albums a year, including instrumental efforts such as Traveling Man and Odd Seasons as well as lyrical showcases such as People Hear What They See.

Tangible Dream and the instrumental full-length The Beauty in All both appeared in 2013. In 2015, he issued The Good Fight, an effort driven by social commentary and retro-soul, and 2016 saw the release of The Odd Tape, an all-instrumental mixtape issued around the same time as his free download EP Alwasta. In early 2017, Oddisee released his 11th studio album, Iceberg, returning to a vocal-driven style. Later in the year, he released Beneath the Surface, a live album featuring his band Good Compny.

ABOUT SUDAN ARCHIVES

Sink, the anticipated follow up to Sudan Archives’ self-titled debut, continues to define the experimental R&B artist as a singular new voice. Her unique blend of ethereal R&B vocals, violin figures and hip-hop beats has already won over the likes of Pitchfork, the New York Times, The Guardian, NPR Music, and more. “‘Sink’ describes the way I want my music to make you feel,” she says, “It’s inspired by my love of fluidity, movement of jellyfish and water.”

Sudan Archives (Sudan for short) taught herself to play the violin in elementary school, mostly by ear. After discovering the violin playing style of both Northeast and West African fiddlers and musicians like Asim Gorashi, Ali Farka Touré and Juldeh Camarah, her eyes opened to new ways of incorporating this instrument into her sound. “The way they played the violin was different from classical music. I resonated with their style, and I was like, maybe I can blend it with electronic music.”

Fusing folk music and electronic production was the turning point for Sudan. “I started mixing my violin into beats,” she says, “I’d just sing straight into the iPad.” She’s refined her early DIY style to a setup that centres on a midi violin, and creates most of her songs, synths and bass lines from the violin synthesizer. She moved to Los Angeles to study music technology at age 19, and signed with Stones Throw in 2017.