• All Venues

    Close

Events / Cinefamily (7)

Friday, May 27

Touch Zen

Cinefamily

611 N. Fairfax, Los Angeles, CA

7:00pm

The woods of early American settlers were a territory of savage darkness:the home of the devil and mysteriously foreboding. Like the untamed American continent itself, the woods were an unknowable place,and still remain ripe for projections of fantasy and horror (see: The Witch). Surrealist photographer (and first time filmmaker) Avery Crounse’s Eyes of Fire seizes the psychology of these early settlers in this poor-man’s-punk take on the supernatural battle between good and evil, rife with impressively fantastical set pieces—from trees with faces and a mysterious naked forest-dwelling sect to rains of skulls and bones—all swung on a shoestring budget. ALL OF THEM WITCHES proudly resurrects this fierce, DIY horror flick, excavated from several realms beyond the consciousness of even the committed cult-film lover, for your late-night enjoyment.
Dir. Avery Crounse, 1983, 35mm, 90 min.

- See more at: http://www.cinefamily.org/films/all-of-them-witches/#all-of-them-witches...

Read More

Sunday, May 29

The color of space - the green slime

Cinefamily

611 N. Fairfax, Los Angeles, CA

1:00pm

Live Set from DJ Mean Mr. Mustard!
Join us at noon for cocktails on the patio!
“Nothing ever happens here,” moans a grumpy space technician. Suddenly, right on cue, an asteroid teeming with extraterrestrial green goo is on a collision course with Earth! What follows is a delectable smorgasbord of charmingly constructed space station miniatures, non-sequiturs delivered with the stiffest of lips, and special effects so cheap they wouldn’t even sell off of a clearance rack. In simpler terms: It’s B-movie heaven. Watch as crew members of Gamma 3 get picked off one-by-one, with each death more bizarrely gory than the next. Defying logic at every turn (why is sentient, chiseled jaw Commander Jack Rankin’s first battle instinct always to throw things at the aliens, including his laser gun?), The Green Slime is a delirious, self-serious, silly alien creature feature of the highest order. Come for the aliens with bloodshot, perma-stoned eyes; stay for the flubbed line readings and psych-rock theme song.
Dir. Kinji Fukasaku, 1968, 35mm (Courtesy of BFI), 90 min.
- See more at: http://www.cinefamily.org/films/hangover-matinees/#hangover-matinees-the...

Read More

A Touch of Zen

Cinefamily

611 N. Fairfax, Los Angeles, CA

4:00pm

After a long run at Shaw Brothers studio on the mainland, King Hu left for Taiwan and crafted the masterpiece Dragon Inn, which led to the opportunity to tackle his most ambitious project by far: A Touch of Zen — a tale of a young artist who falls for a roving warrior committed to avenging the death of her father at the hands of the Imperial agents of the Ming dynasty.
An oddity in the Wuxia canon, and considered to be the film that legitimized beloved martial arts-driven Chinese genre films as “art”, King Hu packs in visual experimentation — with balletic and quixotic battles sequences, transcendental nature scenes, and detective stories giving way to supernatural indulgence, pacifist monks ultimately kicking ass when it’s time to throw down, and loving homage to the westerns of Anthony Mann — in this astonishing 14th Century epic, finally given its due with a stunning 4K restoration.
Dir. King Hu, 1971, DCP Restoration, 200 min.
- See more at: http://www.cinefamily.org/films/king-hus-a-touch-of-zen-new-4k-restorati...

After a long run at Shaw Brothers studio on the mainland, King Hu left for Taiwan and crafted the masterpiece Dragon Inn, which led to the opportunity to tackle his most ambitious project by far: A Touch of Zen — a tale of a young artist who falls for a roving warrior committed to avenging the death of her father at the hands of the Imperial agents of the Ming dynasty.

An oddity in the Wuxia canon, and considered to be the film that legitimized beloved martial arts-driven Chinese genre films as “art”, King Hu packs in visual experimentation — with balletic and quixotic battles sequences, transcendental nature scenes, and detective stories giving way to supernatural indulgence, pacifist monks ultimately kicking ass when it’s time to throw down, and loving homage to the westerns of Anthony Mann — in this astonishing 14th Century epic, finally given its due with a stunning 4K restoration.

Dir. King Hu, 1971, DCP Restoration, 200 min.

- See more at: http://www.cinefamily.org/films/king-hus-a-touch-of-zen-new-4k-restorati...

Read More

Monday, May 30

The Five Minute Game

Cinefamily

611 N. Fairfax, Los Angeles, CA

5:00pm

Summer’s around the corner, and you know how we here at the theater love two things in tandem: busting out the patio grill, and The Five Minutes Game. What’s all this about a game, you ask? We’re firm believers in “every movie is interesting for at least its first five minutes,” those fascinating moments when you’re still entering the new world a film presents you, and trying to figure out what the hell’s going on. We’ve chosen fifteen movies you’ve likely never seen before (with most of them still unavailable on DVD), line ‘em up and only show you the first five minutes of each (excluding the opening credits). Then you, the audience, will vote on which film to watch in its entirety. So bring something to cook on our grill and let’s get started!
5:00-6:30PM – The Five Minutes Game!
6:30-7:30PM – we tally the votes and BBQ on the patio!
7:30-9:00PM – we watch the winning film!

Read More

Blue Velvet

Cinefamily

611 N. Fairfax, Los Angeles, CA

10:00pm

An earthquake of a movie when it was released, Blue Velvet begins as a collage of a Mr. Rogers-worthy suburban neighborhood—with Crayola colored roses and white picket fences—quaint until a moldy severed ear is discovered in a local park and the film dives down a bizarro rabbit hole. With a cute Hardy Boys-esque patina, and steeped in the lethal eroticism of a neo-noir, Lynch’s grotesque small town mystery articulated his unique filmmaking taxonomy with a host of now-legendary characters and moments — like Dennis Hopper (in a career reviving performance) as depraved gang-leader Frank Booth, huffing from his gas mask to Roy Orbison songs, and the enigmatic, masochistic Dorothy Vallens (Rossellini) hanging her curly-haired head back in Jeffery (Kyle McLaughlin)’s naked arms, yearning for love. No less hideous or thrilling today than it was at the time of its explosive release 30 years ago, the newly restored Blue Velvet is a crime, a lie, an addiction, a caress, and all the time we are together… in dreams.

Dir. David Lynch, 1986, DCP Restoration, 120 min.

An earthquake of a movie when it was released, Blue Velvet begins as a collage of a Mr. Rogers-worthy suburban neighborhood—with Crayola colored roses and white picket fences—quaint until a moldy severed ear is discovered in a local park and the film dives down a bizarro rabbit hole. With a cute Hardy Boys-esque patina, and steeped in the lethal eroticism of a neo-noir, Lynch’s grotesque small town mystery articulated his unique filmmaking taxonomy with a host of now-legendary characters and moments — like Dennis Hopper (in a career reviving performance) as depraved gang-leader Frank Booth, huffing from his gas mask to Roy Orbison songs, and the enigmatic, masochistic Dorothy Vallens (Rossellini) hanging her curly-haired head back in Jeffery (Kyle McLaughlin)’s naked arms, yearning for love. No less hideous or thrilling today than it was at the time of its explosive release 30 years ago, the newly restored Blue Velvet is a crime, a lie, an addiction, a caress, and all the time we are together… in dreams.

Dir. David Lynch, 1986, DCP Restoration, 120 min.

- See more at: http://www.cinefamily.org/films/blue-velvet-30th-anniversary-restoration...

Read More

Thursday, June 2

Monday, June 6

Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption: Mission Impossible

Cinefamily

611 N. Fairfax, Los Angeles, CA

7:30pm

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and his friends (who, in the past, have included everyone from Jon Hamm to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the front row couches, mics in hand, and say whatever hilarious thing pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen.

Dir J.J. Abrams, 2006, 35mm, 126 min.

 

Read More