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Events / REDCAT (9)

Sunday, September 21

Angel City Jazz Festival 2014

REDCAT

631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles, CA 90012

8:00pm

The 2014 festival arrives at REDCAT on September 21 with a double bill: the fiercely creative duo of pianist Satoko Fujii and trumpeter Kappa Maki opens for DownBeat’s “Rising Star Drummer” Allison Miller and her high-octane five-piece band BOOM TIC BOOM! Headlining on September 26 is NEA Jazz Master Toshiko Akiyoshi, on piano alongside bassist Paul Gill and drummer Aaron Kimmel. The trio is preceded by the debut of a Los Angeles Jazz Society commission from pianist-composer Cathlene Pineda and L.A.’s first-ever poet laureate Eloise Klein Healy.

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Monday, September 22

The Seen and Unseen: New Films by Rebecca Baron and Adele Horne

REDCAT

631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles, CA 90012

8:30pm

L.A. independent film favorites Rebecca Baron (okay bye-bye) and Adele Horne (Tailenders), both known for intimately observed essay films, also produce visually nuanced works on the role of perception in cinema. Their latest films offer distinctive takes on how photographic records reveal what may otherwise elude the immediate senses: the hidden, the unseen. Baron’s Detour De Force (2014, 29 min., DCP) visits the world of “thoughtographer” Ted Serios, who in the mid-1960s specialized in generating Polaroid images by force of mind alone. Horne debuts In Common (2014, 19 min., 16mm), which sensuously chronicles the cycles of days and seasons in a hillside urban garden.

In person: Rebecca Baron and Adele Horne

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Friday, September 26

Angel City Jazz Festival 2014

REDCAT

631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles, CA 90012

8:00pm

The 2014 festival arrives at REDCAT on September 21 with a double bill: the fiercely creative duo of pianist Satoko Fujii and trumpeter Kappa Maki opens for DownBeat’s “Rising Star Drummer” Allison Miller and her high-octane five-piece band BOOM TIC BOOM! Headlining on September 26 is NEA Jazz Master Toshiko Akiyoshi, on piano alongside bassist Paul Gill and drummer Aaron Kimmel. The trio is preceded by the debut of a Los Angeles Jazz Society commission from pianist-composer Cathlene Pineda and L.A.’s first-ever poet laureate Eloise Klein Healy.

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Saturday, September 27

Small Museum for the American Metaphor

REDCAT

631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles, CA 90012

12:00pm

Small Museum for an American Metaphor is an exhibition which brings together European perspectives on the American West, and more specifically, the particularities embedded in the idealized fictions surrounding it. The visual argument here is that there is a certain architectonic “idea” that dwells on the celebration of Endlessness as mythicized in the American West. The metaphor is the base for an architecture that blurs the distinction between building and object, collapsing the different scales. It is an architecture that celebrates the fiction of the “wide open” and seeks to re-evaluate/reinterpret the world as a gigantic interior. In that context, a successful intervention is able to define hierarchies, carve out places, and make shared points of reference. The exhibition, much in the tradition of showcasing objects in a defined space, such as a cabinet, “collects”artworks, architectural models, drawings and other elements that consciously fade the distinction between object and representation.

Ultimately it is a show on urban strategies, but starting from the conviction that these very strategies can only be conveyed if presented in an oblique way. The show proposes a method that understands beauty and hedonism not so much as the enemy of hierarchy and organization, but despite all senses of responsibility, its driving force.  

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Monumental Ambiguities: Pre-Columbian artifacts under the spell of the (in)visible.

REDCAT

631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles, CA 90012

6:00pm

A double bill followed by a panel discussion that considers the debate over artifacts, cultural property and historical stewardship in Mesoamerica. In Paradox (2001, 30 min.) Leandro Katz alternates between static views of the stone altar of the mythic Dragon of Quiriguá in Guatemala and imagery of controversial labor practices at nearby banana plantations. Jesse Lerner and Sandra Rozental’s documentary La piedra ausente (The Absent Stone, 2013, 82 min.) recounts the fate of the largest carved stone monolith of the Americas, which represented the pre-Hispanic water deity. When moved in 1964 from San Miguel Coatlinchan to Mexico City’s National Anthropology Museum, the extraction sparked a local rebellion. The stone eventually became an urban monument and altogether different icon of Mexican identity, while back in Coatlinchan, replicas of the absent stone appear everywhere, still resonant in the community’s memory.

In person: Mariana Botey, Jesse Lerner, Sandra Rozental and others

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Tuesday, September 30

Small Museum for the American Metaphor

REDCAT

631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles, CA 90012

12:00pm

Small Museum for an American Metaphor is an exhibition which brings together European perspectives on the American West, and more specifically, the particularities embedded in the idealized fictions surrounding it. The visual argument here is that there is a certain architectonic “idea” that dwells on the celebration of Endlessness as mythicized in the American West. The metaphor is the base for an architecture that blurs the distinction between building and object, collapsing the different scales. It is an architecture that celebrates the fiction of the “wide open” and seeks to re-evaluate/reinterpret the world as a gigantic interior. In that context, a successful intervention is able to define hierarchies, carve out places, and make shared points of reference. The exhibition, much in the tradition of showcasing objects in a defined space, such as a cabinet, “collects”artworks, architectural models, drawings and other elements that consciously fade the distinction between object and representation.

Ultimately it is a show on urban strategies, but starting from the conviction that these very strategies can only be conveyed if presented in an oblique way. The show proposes a method that understands beauty and hedonism not so much as the enemy of hierarchy and organization, but despite all senses of responsibility, its driving force.  

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Friday, October 3

Hyo Jin Kim/Hyung Su Kim: Madame Freedom

REDCAT

631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles, CA 90012

12:30pm

“Intriguing and visually seductive.” – The Times (London)

U.S. Premiere

The Seoul-based video and performance collaborators who awed audiences at the 2013 Edinburgh International Festival, now present the U.S. premiere of their immersive Madame Freedom at REDCAT. A stirring fusion of live interactive dance and a sumptuous media installation that incorporates black-and-white footage from a famous 1956 Korean melodrama Jayu buin (Madame Freedom), this stage collaboration looks to the historical struggle of Korean women to break free of the social, economic and political constraints of yesteryear as it considers the uneasy contemporary legacy of hard-won changes nearly 60 years later. Today’s Madame Freedom is a rumination on identity, myth, and the tension between dreams and the burdens of the past. Choreographed by Hyo Jin Kim, who co-directs the production with Hyung Su Kim.

 

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Monday, October 6

Small Museum for the American Metaphor

REDCAT

631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles, CA 90012

12:00pm

Small Museum for an American Metaphor is an exhibition which brings together European perspectives on the American West, and more specifically, the particularities embedded in the idealized fictions surrounding it. The visual argument here is that there is a certain architectonic “idea” that dwells on the celebration of Endlessness as mythicized in the American West. The metaphor is the base for an architecture that blurs the distinction between building and object, collapsing the different scales. It is an architecture that celebrates the fiction of the “wide open” and seeks to re-evaluate/reinterpret the world as a gigantic interior. In that context, a successful intervention is able to define hierarchies, carve out places, and make shared points of reference. The exhibition, much in the tradition of showcasing objects in a defined space, such as a cabinet, “collects”artworks, architectural models, drawings and other elements that consciously fade the distinction between object and representation.

Ultimately it is a show on urban strategies, but starting from the conviction that these very strategies can only be conveyed if presented in an oblique way. The show proposes a method that understands beauty and hedonism not so much as the enemy of hierarchy and organization, but despite all senses of responsibility, its driving force.  

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Leslie Scalapino & Konrad Steiner Way

REDCAT

631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles, CA 90012

8:30pm

“Steiner’s illuminations of Scalapino’s ever intensely tuned voice makes this so potent a work on its own shifting ground.” Steve Dickison, The Poetry Center, SFSU

San Francisco filmmaker Konrad Steiner took 12 years to complete a montage cycle set to the late Leslie Scalapino’s most celebrated poem, way—a sprawling book-length odyssey of shardlike urban impressions, fraught with obliquely felt social and sexual tensions. Based on the experimental writer’s own reading of the poem, recorded in 2000, Steiner created six stylistically distinctive films for each section of way, using sources ranging from Kodachrome footage of sun-kissed S.F. street scenes to internet clips of the Iraq war to a fragmented Fred Astaire dance number.

 

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