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Events / Concerts & Live Music (561)

Tuesday, July 7

Little Red

Casa 0101

2102 E. 1st St., Boyle Heights, 90033

8:00pm

CASA 0101 Theater is proud to present “Little Red”, a contemporary musical adaptation, with a punk-rock Chicana twist, of the classic fairytale Little Red Riding Hood. This Familia-friendly musical takes us on a rebellious teenager’s journey through the treacherous Holly-Woods where she must forgo technology and modern transportation in order to visit her ailing grandmother. Standing in her way is Don Coyote, a loner teen rocker that tries to seduce Red with his style, cool demeanor, and British accent, only to try and rob Red of the most precious thing that she has yet to appreciate – her family. With the help of the bumbling boyscout, Corky Woodsmán, and his owl Paz, will Little Red be able to brave the dangers of the Holly-Woods and the smooth talking Don Coyote? Will she be able to help her grandmother and find the value in her family’s traditions? Come find out in this fun and fresh adaptation of the classic tale that will have audiences laughing and cheering. Featuring original music by Grammy award-winning artist, Quetzal.

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Lianne La Havas (SOLD OUT)

Troubadour

9081 Santa Monica Blvd., West Hollywood, CA 90069

8:00pm

One night last October, Lianne La Havas' life changed on a dime. The 22-year-old London-born singer, songwriter, and guitarist had been asked to appear on the influential British music show Later… with Jools Holland (a rare invitation for an unknown artist), and she made sure to take advantage of her moment. Cutting a striking figure in a white pleated skirt and side-swept poof of hair, with a radiant smile spread across her face, La Havas performed "Age"—a playful tune about a dalliance with an older man—with effortless grace and charm. When the show aired, the reaction was instantaneous and unanimous: Lianne La Havas was on her way to becoming a star. "With her electric guitar strung high, and her beautiful, smoky, vibrato-rich croon of a voice enunciating every word, she seems to be confiding in you directly, with no filter in between—a strange (and rare) mix of fragility ... and impregnable, ensnaring confidence," raved the UK's Sunday Times about the performance.

Following La Havas' performance on Later…, her London club residency sold out in a few hours and she was tapped by Bon Iver's Justin Vernon, who had also appeared on the program that night, to open his band's North American tour in December 2011. She was nominated for the BBC's Sound of 2012—an annual poll of music critics and industry figures to find the most promising new musical talent (past winners include Adele and Jessie J).

The daughter of a Greek father and a Jamaican mother, La Havas fell in love with music at a young age and cites her parents' tastes as a huge influence. Her dad, who played accordion, piano, and guitar, favored jazz artists like Louis Armstrong and Charlie Parker, while her mother loved female soul-R&B singers like Jill Scott, Erykah Badu, and Mary J. Blige. La Havas remembers wanting to sing herself at age seven after watching Lauryn Hill belt out a gospel tune in Sister Act 2. She enrolled in college to study art but dropped out to pursue a career in music after joining a circle of friends who wrote and recorded music while attending London's famed performing arts institution The BRIT School. One of those friends asked La Havas to accompany her at a gig and also introduced her to British singer Paloma Faith, with whom La Havas toured as a back-up singer. She also performed in bands, put her music up on MySpace, and found management, which led her to Hales and her future. Now La Havas is ready to take center stage herself and win over American audiences with the August 7 U.S. release of Is Your Love Big Enough? by Nonesuch Records.

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Indigo Girls

El Rey Theatre

5515 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 95928

8:00pm

Amy Ray and Emily Saliers are Indigo Girls. Rolling Stone describes them as the “ideal duet partners. Their voices soar and swoop as one, alternately raucous and soothing. When they sing together, they radiate a sense of shared purpose that adds muscle to their lanky, deeply felt folk-tinged pop songs”. Together they write, arrange, record and perform music which over the course of twenty five years has become a vital part of the lives of their legion of devoted fans around the world, informing and rewarding them day to day.
With twelve original studio albums, three live records, various Greatest Hits compilations, a Rarities and a Christmas record to their credit, the iconic duo continues to challenge itself creatively, over and over again, adding to a body of work that contains such contemporary classic songs as Galileo, Shame on You, Closer To Fine, Kid Fears, Love of Our Lives, Making Promises, Get out the Map, Moment of Forgiveness, Least Complicated and Go. After numerous Grammy nominations and awards and gold and platinum certifications and decades of touring in clubs, arenas and everything in between,  Indigo Girls remain active and  relevant, always viewing their music as a fresh opportunity for exploration and discovery. “We really work hard to not lean on any tried and true path in making our albums,” says Ray. “So when it comes to writing new songs and working and performing with different musicians, every record and every tour feels like a completely different adventure for us.
Amy and Emily first met as fifth and sixth-graders inDecatur,Georgiaand began singing together during high school. Originally billed as Saliers & Ray, the pair adopted the name Indigo Girls during their undergraduate days atAtlanta’sEmoryUniversity. The Indigos were attending classes by day and performing as an acoustic duo in local clubs by night when they made their first stab at recording in 1985 with the single Crazy Game / Everybody’s Waiting (for Someone To Come Home) which they issued on their own label, followed by an EP and in 1987, their first full length LP, Strange Fire, produced by John Keane.
In 1988, the big-time beckoned Indigo Girls. Signed to Epic Records and EMI Music, they recorded Indigo Girls with producer Scott Litt at Ocean Way Studios inL.A.With Amy and Emily on vocals and acoustic guitars, Indigo Girls featured contributions from REM, Hothouse Flowers and Luka Bloom. The record was released in 1989 (the Boston Globe stated “The Indigo Girls have simply made the best debut album so far this year”) and the Indigo Girls began criss-crossing the country on tour (a process that has continued without pause throughout their career) headlining or supporting the likes of REM, Neil Young and the Violent Femmes.
Decades into their career, the Indigo Girls still amaze conventional pundits with their ability to grow and thrive no matter what the state of the music industry is at any given point. The duo’s constant touring, as well as staunch dedication to a number of social and environmental causes, has earned them a fervidly devoted following over the years. So many artists who launched their careers in the late 1980s have slipped from our collective memory. In contrast, the Indigo Girls stand tall, having earned the lasting respect and devotion of a multi-generational audience which continues to experience their creative evolution in the studio and on stage. The adventure may take the form of an adrenaline-fueled live CD or a warm reflective holiday album or a collection of songs that can veer from the raucous to intimate in the blink of an eye. No matter where their creative journey takes them, they hold out a hand to their listeners and we get to feel it all.

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Wednesday, July 8

A Kingdom of Images: French Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, 1660–1715

Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90049

11:00am

From grand royal portraits to satiric views of everyday life, and from small-scale fashion prints decorated with actual fabrics to monumental panoramas of Versailles and the Louvre, this exhibition explores the rich variety of prints that came to define French power and prestige in the era of Louis XIV (1638–1715). During the Sun King's long reign, printmakers and publishers effectively deployed prints to promote French culture, art, and style. Commemorating the 300th anniversary of Louis XIV's death, A Kingdom of Images: French Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, 1660–1715 features nearly 100 works from the Getty Research Institute and the Bibliothèque nationale de France.

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Molten Color: Glassmaking in Antiquity

Getty Villa Malibu

17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Los Angeles, CA

12:00pm

The Museum's acquisition from the Oppenländer collection of over 350 pieces of ancient glass is the focus of this exhibition. Remarkable for their high quality and chronological breadth, the roughly 180 works on view are accompanied by videos illustrating ancient glassmaking techniques.

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