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Tuesday, August 2

Tribute to Andrzej Zulawski,: Possession

Cinefamily

611 N. Fairfax, Los Angeles, CA

10:30pm

Capturing the energy generated when two people whose lives are so intensely fused and woven are forcibly split, Possession is an emotional nuclear explosion. If all we were given were its operatic and shamanistic performances by leads Isabelle Adjani and Sam Neill, it’s impossible-to-describe music by Andrzej Korzynski, and its masterful, hyper-kinetical ballet of camera choreography — all delivered with the force of a long-suppressed traumatic memory — then Possession would already be the best film about divorce ever filmed. But when the angels and demons of our inner nature are literally incarnated in phantasmagorical form — the kind requiring the talents of Oscar-winning creature FX master Carlo Rambaldi (who, instead of making a cutey-pie “E.T.”, concocts a tentacled Lovecraftian octo-sex-demon) — you have the kind of explosively cathartic and entertaining experience that leads to movie-lover nirvanic bliss. Welcome to Possession, your new favorite movie.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1981, 35mm, 123 min.

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Wednesday, August 3

Kington Trio at the Grammy Museum

GRAMMY Museum

800 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, 90015

11:15am

Curated by the Woody Guthrie Center, the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. LIVE, and Kingston Trio Legacy Project, the exhibit traces the Folk Revival era of the early 1960s and spotlights the important contributions of the Kingston Trio in making folk music popular with a new generation.

Among the items included in the exhibit are:

  • Instruments owned by Kingston, Trio, Dave Van Ronk, Paddy Clancy, and John Sebastian
  • Handwritten documents from artists, including a special display of Bob Dylan's handwritten lyrics of "Song to Woody"
  • Stage costume pieces worn by Kingston Trio, Josh White, Phil Ochs, and others
  • Multiple listening stations, video displays, and much more

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Fantastic Planet

Cinefamily

611 N. Fairfax, Los Angeles, CA

7:30pm

Animation Breakdown is back with your favorite blue aliens in the 1973 cult French classic Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage), the hypnotic sci-fi masterpiece by director René Laloux and illustrator Roland Topor, newly restored by Janus Films. Based on the French sci-fi novel Oms en série by Stefan Wul, Fantastic Planet follows a revolutionary clash on the alien planet Ygam, where enslaved humans—Oms—are treated as pets by their giant native blue masters—Draags—in their meditation-based utopia. Developed at the Jirí Trnka Studios in the old Czech Republic, Fantastic Planet is a landmark of hallucinatory animation, thanks to the eerie creature & backgrounds designs of surreal illustrator Roland Topor and the amazing psychedelic soundtrack by French jazz pianist Alain Goraguer (sideman of Boris Vian and Serge Gainsbourg).

Dir. René Laloux, 1973, DCP, 72 minutes

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The Wombats

Fonda Theatre

6126 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA

9:00pm

short stay- old buildinghe Wombats are an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 2003. The band comprises native Liverpudlians Matthew Murphy (lead vocals, guitar, keyboard), Daniel (Dan) Haggis (drums, percussion, guitar, keyboard and backing vocals) and Norwegian-born Tord Øverland Knudsen (bass guitar, guitar, keyboard and backing vocals). The band is signed to 14th Floor Records in the United Kingdom and Bright Antenna in the United States. The Wombats have sold over 1 million copies worldwide. fourth floor central tower.

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Queen of the Underground: Films of Sarah Jacobson

Cinefamily

611 N. Fairfax, Los Angeles, CA

11:30pm

Before leaving this world all too soon at age 32, Sarah Jacobson left an indelible mark on underground filmmaking as an outspoken feminist proponent of the D.I.Y. ethos. A student of George Kuchar’s unbridled non-conformist enthusiasm, she had the freshly xeroxed news from the underground to back up her 8mm manifestos. Armed with soundtracks featuring the likes of Mudhoney and Heavens to Betsy, Jacobson took her subversive films on the road, producing and promoting them with the help of her cool mom and a network of punk zine tape traders. Her debut, I Was A Teenage Serial Killer, is a raw, angry 19-year-old’s rebel yell for feminist vengeance that gender-flips the slasher movie script with bristling vitality. Her feature, Mary Jane’s Not A Virgin Anymore, visits the world of a punk rock movie theater to tell the story of an intellectual young woman’s sexual awakening. If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to push popcorn with a rogue’s gallery of punks, drunks, poseurs, collector freaks and future best friends, or even if you have, this is your movie. Justly praised by Roger Ebert and Kim Gordon alike, these films are more than just totally 90’s time capsules, they’re also the ultimate cinematic retort to every condescending straight white catcalling male slob you’ve ever gotten mixed up with.

 

I Was A Teenage Serial Killer, dir. Sarah Jacobson, 1992, 16mm, 27min.
Mary Jane’s Not A Virgin Anymore, dir. Sarah Jacobson, 1997, 16mm, 98min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

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Thursday, August 4

Leigh Stein discusses and signs Land of Enchantment

Book Soup LA

8818 W. Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, 60069

7:00pm

Set against the stark and surreal landscape of New Mexico, Land of Enchantment is a coming-of-age memoir about young love, obsession, and loss, and how a person can imprint a place in your mind forever.  
When Leigh Stein received a call from an unknown number in July 2011, she let it go to voice mail, assuming it would be her ex-boyfriend Jason. Instead, the call was from his brother: Jason had been killed in a motorcycle accident. He was twenty-three years old. She had seen him alive just a few weeks earlier.   Leigh first met Jason at an audition for a tragic play. He was nineteen and troubled and intensely magnetic, a dead ringer for James Dean. Leigh was twenty-two and living at home with her parents, trying to figure out what to do with her young adult life. Within months, they had fallen in love and moved to New Mexico, the Land of Enchantment, a place neither of them had ever been. But what was supposed to be a romantic adventure quickly turned sinister, as Jason s behavior went from playful and spontaneous to controlling and erratic, eventually escalating to violence. Now New Mexico was marked by isolation and the anxiety of how to leave a man she both loved and feared. Even once Leigh moved on to New York, throwing herself into her work, Jason and their time together haunted her.
Land of Enchantment lyrically explores the heartbreaking complexity of why the person hurting you the most can be impossible to leave.. With searing honesty and cutting humor, Leigh wrestles with what made her fall in love with someone so destructive and how to grieve a man who wasn’t always good to her.

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