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Events / Westside (328)

Thursday, February 11

The Director's Series: Michael Govan and Frank Gehry

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 92656

7:30pm

(FREE-TICKETS REQUIRED) In conjunction with the exhibition Frank Gehry, LACMA CEO and Wallis Annenberg Director Michael Govan talks with architect Frank Gehry about Gehry's aesthetic considerations, the role of social and cultural issues in architecture, and architecture's relationship to the city, all of which have been central to his work for over five decades.

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Hammer Screenings: The Haunted Sword

Hammer Museum

10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90024

7:30pm

Copresented with The Japan Business Association of Southern California, The Japan Foundation, UCLA Terasaki Center for Japanese Studies, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, and the School of the Arts and Architecture, and Shochiku Co., Ltd.

Drama, lust, vengeance, and haunted weaponry collide in this explosive Japanese kabuki. Famed female impersonator Tamasaburo V joins Kanzaburo XVIII and Nizaemon to form the dream cast of this filmed live performance of a 17th-century dramatic form. (2010, dir. Hiroyuki Nakatani, 113 min. English subtitles.)

Following the screening, join us in the courtyard for an after-party featuring DJ Hashim B, sake tasting and cash bar, free Japanese food and free, limited-edition Kabuki-inspired Uniqlo t-shirts and totes bags.

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Father, Son & Holy Coach

Odyssey Theater

2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles, 90025

8:00pm to 2:20pm

Southern storytelling at its best! John Posey (How to Get Away with Murder, Teen Wolf) stars in an all-new revival of his acclaimed comedy about a former small town football star who attempts to live vicariously through his son. A guest production at the Odyssey Theatre. Opening Feb. 13.

Welcome to Tupelo County, Georgia, where even the local Easter egg hunt takes on legendary, Super Bowl proportions. In Father, Son & Holy Coach, Friday night football is the motif that illuminates a father/son journey gone hilariously off the rails. Over the course of 85 minutes, Posey seamlessly portrays over two dozen different characters — the entire town of Tupelo.

“It’s a very funny, but also poignant, study of the fragile psyche of an aggressively overprotective father,” explains Posey. “This man’s main reason for living is to prevent his child from experiencing what he perceives to be life’s failures. Finally, after years of trying to live up to his father’s expectations, the son must go his own way.”

Posey debuted Father, Son & Holy Coach to rave reviews in1993 (“Wonderful… much humor drawn from real people” — Daily Variety; “A funny and absorbing chronicle of a fanatical father's attempt to rear a gridiron superstar” —Los Angeles Times) and has since toured it all around the country. The screen adaptation has recently been set up at Salt Entertainment Group.

Best known as Scott McCall on the MTV series Teen Wolf, producer Tyler Posey is John’s real-life son.

“This is a father/son story, and this production is a father/son endeavor,” John says.

Father, Son & Holy Coach opens for press on Feb. 13 and continues through March 20. Performances take place Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., and Sundays at 2 p.m. There will be two preview performances, on Thursday, Feb. 11 and Friday, Feb. 12 at 8 p.m. All tickets are $25, except previews which are $15. Presented by Rainy Night Films in association with Tyler Posey in a guest production at the Odyssey Theatre, 2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd., West Los Angeles, 90025. For more information, go to (323) 960-7724 or go to www.holycoach.net/.

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HIATUS KAIYOTE

El Rey Theatre

5515 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036

9:00pm

The members of Australian future soul band Hiatus Kaiyote have unveiled Choose Your Weapon (Flying Buddha/Sony Music Masterworks), their most opulent, expansive and ambitious project yet.

In a short time, this quartet has embarked on an odyssey that began in bohemian Melbourne and has taken them to the Grammy Awards and beyond.

Hiatus Kaiyote's story begins with a girl toting a novelty guitar. Bender, as everybody calls him, was hanging out at Gertrude's Brown Couch in Melbourne's groovy inner-suburb of Fitzroy when the striking Nai performed solo. "I didn't know what she was gonna do because she was there with this really whack pink guitar," Bender remembers drolly. "She started the set explaining that her guitar was locked in someone's house and she couldn't get it, so she had to borrow this one. It was like this child's pink shit little nylon guitar. She just started playing and singing and I was like, Whoa, what is this? This is crazy! I was instantly blown away by the voice and the complexity of the tunes. I'd never really heard that combination of elements before. Straight away I was like, Oh, man, I gotta do a band with this girl." He business-carded her post-gig but Nai, having no formal musical background, was initially unsure about collaborating, worried her songs were "a bit weird".  In fact, the fantastically named Hiatus Kaiyote came together over time, its members encountering one another fatefully in various bands, cafés, and share houses. Bender, who'd made it his "mission" to seek out complementary players, found that challenging. Says Nai, "I was ready to give up on the whole band idea, because the musicians were amazing – like, really gifted musicians – but it needed more than that. It needed emotional connection to the music – but with creativity." She retreated into her beloved desert… Hiatus Kaiyote eventually crystallized after the quiet Pez joined, along with his curious roomie Simon. "Once we were all in the same room playing, it was just like, This is what it's supposed to be like!," Nai enthuses. Hiatus Kaiyote jammed on their now Grammy-nominated song ‘Nakamarra’ – which Nai had just penned about a friend devoting herself to working outback with Indigenous Australians. "I still bring in songs," she says, "but we can come up with shit from scratch together – and that's way more rewarding. Usually the best stuff comes out when you're just kinda winging it." Indeed, Hiatus Kaiyote isn't merely a soul/funk/jazz collective – it's a boldly unconventional paradigm, with Nai a singer/songwriter, and Bender, Simon and Moss all instinctive musicians and bedroom producers.   Hiatus Kaiyote issued their acclaimed debut Tawk Tomahawk, of authentic homemade grooves, via Bandcamp – and shot a mesmerising bushland video for ‘Nakamarra’. Meanwhile, they started to attract influential industry fans starthing with Taylor McFerrin whom they supported at Melbourne's historic Esplanade Hotel ("The Espy"). Simon recalls, "We got off stage and he was just like, What the hell was that?" The Brooklyn jazz-hopper championed Hiatus Kaiyote in an interview by the blog From Paris, which later profiled the band. Taylor also shared their music with BBC tastemaker DJ Gilles Peterson (they'd later win "Best Breakthrough Act" at his Worldwide Awards) and Anthony Valadez at California's KCRW. The Roots' Questlove proclaimed their music "undeniable". "It really went gangbusters," Nai says. Even Prince tweeted about Hiatus Kaiyote.   Salaam Remi, the esteemed producer who's liaised with Amy Winehouse, Nas and The Fugees, determined that Hiatus Kaiyote be the flagship signing to his Sony imprint Flying Buddha. Hiatus Kaiyote repackaged Tawk Tomahawk with a new version of Nakamarra featuring a verse by Q-Tip, the legendary member of A Tribe Called Quest. They subsequently became the first Australian act to receive a Grammy nomination in an R&B category ("Best R&B Performance"). "Just to be propelled into that kind of platform and welcomed into that lineage is validation in itself," Nai muses.

 

 Today, Hiatus Kaiyote present Choose Your Weapon – imagining the future past, and juxtaposing the acoustic and electronic, over 18 tracks and a 70 minute musical adventure. Again self-produced, this sophomore album honors soul music's history while reveling in its experimentation and globalization of sound. This album, in many ways, was born on stage --  "Most bands generally write their album as they're making it, whereas we already had so much material that our fans were familiar with, so we owed it to them to actually document it," Nai states. Nevertheless, the band did freely explore in the studio, serendipity their muse. And the outfit fully utilized their accumulated vintage synthesizer. "The synth is a really interesting bridge between live instrumentation and production because it's electronic, but essentially it's still an instrument," Nai observes. Above all, Hiatus Kaiyote, tracing the missing links between Rotary Connection, J Dilla and Flying Lotus, chart their evolution on Choose Your Weapon. "With our first record, we'd been together six months or a year," Nai says. "So you put a couple of world tours under your belt and then you try to produce a record, it's a whole other thing."  Intense live, ‘Shaolin Monk Motherfunk’ is synth-funk boogie with a subversive prog-rock breakdown. ‘Borderline With My Atoms’ is quiet storm balladry evoking Minnie Riperton. Nai has depicted the serpentine ‘By Fire’ as "a burial song", the former fire-dancer, who lost her father in a house fire, reclaiming the element's life-giving over destructive force. Hiatus Kaiyote approached one of their idols, orchestrator/composor/multi-instumentalist Miguel Atwood-Ferguson to  put his “one man orchestra” on ‘The Lung’. The album's poetic lead single ‘Breathing Underwater’, was conceived for Stevie Wonder, Nai reveals. "All of our icons kept hearing our music – and Stevie's my favorite one. So it was like, What if Stevie hears one [of the songs]? None of them are good enough! We need to write a new one especially for Stevie. That's why I have the key change turnaround – 'cause he's king of that." However, the lyrics tell of something else. "There's so many love songs, but I wanted to make one that was about really simple forms of love that aren't necessarily romantic – like the love of a cactus that can survive for over 100 years without water and then, when it rains, it blossoms in minutes," Nai suggests. "People always use metaphors to express their love, but the metaphor is its own love within itself – and it is its own universe… So it's like a love song to everything."  On sequencing Choose Your Weapon, Hiatus Kaiyote realized "how epic every single song is," says Bender, every one with intricate layers and its own "vibe". "It was just like a huge, massive, complex puzzle." As such, they've created spacious interludes.  In the past Hiatus Kaiyote have playfully dubbed their transcendent hybrid of jazz, psychedelia, soul, R&B, funk, hip-hop, electronica and worldbeat "multi-dimensional, polyrhythmic gangster shit". Today Bender proposes the eccentric "wondercore", Hiatus Kaiyote's music is less a genre than an immersive experience – a trip. For Nai, the "key" descriptor for Choose Your Weapon is "cinematic". "We definitely see the music as habitats – and each song is its own. It's very visual."

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Friday, February 12

Petit Takett: Love, Legacy, and Recipes from the Maghreb

Skirball Cultural Center

2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90049

12:00pm

Extended through February 14! Sharing food is one of the most genuine forms of cultural exchange. Gathered at the dinner table, we reminisce, share stories, and engage with one another. Petit Takett: Love, Legacy, and Recipes from the Maghreb, an exhibition based on Los Angeles artist and photographer Orly Olivier’s Tunisian Jewish heritage, celebrates food as a powerful connection to the past. A diverse collection of original and historic photographs, family heirlooms, ephemera, and original letterpress posters illustrate the journey of Olivier’s family from Tunisia to Israel and finally to the United States, between the 1950s and the present.

A large-scale image in the gallery transports visitors to Takett’s, the Tunisian restaurant where Olivier’s grandmother shared her love of food and entertaining. Her father’s recipe box, reproductions of his recipe cards (written in French, Arabic, and English), household objects, and family photographs document the diverse culinary traditions of Olivier’s family. Also on display, Olivier’s original photographs and letterpress posters show how she has reinterpreted those traditions for the present day. An interactive recipe mosaic, inspired by the designs of North African textiles and tiles, invites visitors to leave behind their own family recipes.

Olivier has commemorated her Tunisian heritage through the Petit Takett project, which comprises a food and lifestyle blog as well as a series of dinners and events for the Los Angeles community. The Petit Takett exhibition and related programs, including a Tunisian dinner and a shibori indigo tie-dye workshop, not only share Olivier’s fascinating story with the Skirball community but also encourage visitors of many cultural backgrounds to explore and share their own heritages and customs.

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Manzanar: The Wartime Photographs of Ansel Adams

Skirball Cultural Center

2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90049

12:00pm

Manzanar: The Wartime Photographs of Ansel Adams presents a lesser-known dimension of celebrated photographer Ansel Adams’s body of work, and offers insight into a decisive and disquieting period in American history. Presented at the Skirball in association with the Japanese American National Museum, the exhibition features fifty photographs by Adams of the Japanese American incarceration camp in Manzanar, California, during World War II. These photographs were the subject of Adams’s controversial book Born Free and Equal, published in 1944 while war was still being waged. The book protested the treatment of these American citizens and what Adams called their “enforced exodus.” Powerful forms of civic and artistic expression, the images speak to the Skirball’s mission of confronting injustice, embracing diversity, and preserving community. Manzanar: The Wartime Photographs of Ansel Adams was curated by Robert Flynn Johnson, Curator Emeritus, Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, and organized by Photographic Traveling Exhibitions, Los Angeles, CA.

In addition to Adams’s work, the Skirball’s presentation of the exhibition includes other photographs, documents, publications, artifacts, and works of art  that detail life and conditions at Manzanar and offer personal narratives of the experience. A range of propaganda posters, films, pamphlets, and magazines portray the anger, prejudice, and overt racism of the times. Additional material from Adams’s contemporaries, Dorothea Lange and Toyo Miyatake, is highlighted.

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Art of Japan

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 92656

2:00pm

Immerse yourself in Japanese culture and art by exploring the outstanding collection of painting, netsuke, ceramics, and prints on this 50-minute tour that looks at the museum's collection of works dating from 3000 B.C. to the present. Taking place in the Pavilion for Japanese Art, the tour is enhanced by the unique viewing experience.

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