BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:-//hacksw/handcal//NONSGML v1.0//EN NAME:discoverLA DESCRIPTION:discoverLosAngeles.com event calendar CATEGORIES:Events,Los Angeles REFRESH-INTERVAL;VALUE=DURATION:P1D SOURCE;VALUE=URI:https://www.discoverlosangeles.com/what-to-do/events/31408/ical.ics BEGIN:VEVENT UID:31408-1a5126d92aa84bb37b90c6503dfb4c12@discoverlosangeles.com SEQUENCE:0 COLOR:skyblue DTSTAMP:20130301T223144Z DTSTART:20130317T140000Z DTEND:20130317T150000Z SUMMARY:CONCENTRATIONARY CINEMA/CONCENTRATIONARY MEMORY DESCRIPTION:Alain Resnais's film Night and Fog, made in 1955, is both one of the most often screened films about the Holocaust and the most criticized for its failure to confront the specificity of the genocide. In their collaborative presentation, Griselda Pollock and Max Silverman shift the debate away from the film’s relation to the Holocaust to propose, instead, that the film's political aesthetics of resistance might better be approached through the prism of concentrationary cinema which, they argue, creates a new form of concentrationary memory. Using a French term, concentrationnaire, created by political prisoners returning from Germany’s concentration camps to define a political novelty that Hannah Arendt identified as the core instrument of totalitarianism’s assault on the human condition, their presentation will suggest that the prism of the concentrationary allows us to focus once again, and not at the expense of Holocaust memory, on the politics rather than the ethics of representation of a terrifying experiment in total domination that seeps beyond the ruins of the concentration camps. Pollock and Silverman have co-directed a four-year project entitled Concentrationary Memories and the Politics of Representation. They are the editors and contributors to the series Concentrationary Cinema, Concentrationary Memories, Concentrationary Imaginaries and Concentrationary Art. X-ALT-DESC:

Alain Resnais's film Night and Fog, made in 1955, is both one of the most often screened films about the Holocaust and the most criticized for its failure to confront the specificity of the genocide. In their collaborative presentation, Griselda Pollock and Max Silverman shift the debate away from the film’s relation to the Holocaust to propose, instead, that the film's political aesthetics of resistance might better be approached through the prism of concentrationary cinema which, they argue, creates a new form of concentrationary memory. Using a French term, concentrationnaire, created by political prisoners returning from Germany’s concentration camps to define a political novelty that Hannah Arendt identified as the core instrument of totalitarianism’s assault on the human condition, their presentation will suggest that the prism of the concentrationary allows us to focus once again, and not at the expense of Holocaust memory, on the politics rather than the ethics of representation of a terrifying experiment in total domination that seeps beyond the ruins of the concentration camps.

Pollock and Silverman have co-directed a four-year project entitled Concentrationary Memories and the Politics of Representation. They are the editors and contributors to the series Concentrationary Cinema, Concentrationary Memories, Concentrationary Imaginaries and Concentrationary Art.

LOCATION:10899 Wilshire Blvd, CA 90024, CA, 0 GEO:1;1 URL:https://www.discoverlosangeles.com/what-to-do/events/concentrationary-cinemaconcentrationary-memory IMAGE;VALUE=URI;DISPLAY=BADGE,THUMBNAIL;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:http://www.discoverlosangeles.com/sites/default/files/styles/events_module_thumbnail/public/Activities/hammer0317.png?itok=LzKBBvay CATEGORIES:Film/TV/Radio,Events TRIGGER;RELATED=START:PT1H END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR