Downtown / LA Metro (6)

Lobby of the Los Angeles Theatre in Downtown L.A.

Discover the Historic Theatres on Broadway in Downtown Los Angeles

09/15/2015

Discover Los Angeles

Stretching for six blocks from 3rd to 9th Streets along South Broadway in Downtown Los Angeles, the historic Broadway Theatre District includes 12 movie theatres built between 1910 and 1931. The Broadway Theatre District was added to the National Register of Historic Places in May 1979, the first and largest historic theatre district listed on the Register. It is the only large concentration of movie palaces left in the United States.

At its height, the neon-drenched district had the highest concentration of cinemas in the world, with seating capacity for more than 15,000 patrons. In a February 2006 article for the Los Angeles Times, Cara Mia DiMassa wrote: “Dozens of theaters screened Hollywood's latest fare, played host to star-studded premieres and were filled nightly with thousands of moviegoers. In those days, before World War II, Downtown L.A. was the movie capital of the world."

Efforts by the Los Angeles Conservancy, the Bringing Back Broadway initiative, the Broadway Theatre Group and the Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation have restored many of these theatres to their original splendor. New generations of Angelenos can now experience live performances and cultural events at these spectacular venues. Read on and discover the great movie palaces of the Broadway Theatre District.

Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels interior

Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels

10/12/2012

Discover Los Angeles

Sometimes, buildings are more than just functional places where people seek shelter or gather for events. When everything comes together just right, they serve as places of community and worship, sacred spaces where the spiritual journey is brought to life. The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels is one of L.A.'s most innovative buildings, able to inspire visitors with its warm, inviting interior, perfect for introspection. Outside, blunt, asymmetrical walls stretch the definition of a cathedral, challenging visitors to rethink their ideas about sacred buildings.