Hollywood / article (25)

Ford Theatres Summer Season

Ford Theatres: The Story of an L.A. Icon


Discover Los Angeles

The landmark amphitheatre reopened in July 2016 after a $66-million renovation designed by Levin & Associates Architects with Mia Lehrer + Associates landscape architects. The project was initiated in 2012 and required a 21-month closure of the amphitheatre - programming during construction took place at off-site venues.

Cinespia at Hollywood Forever

Hollywood Forever: The Story of an L.A. Icon


Elina Shatkin

Hollywood Forever's charms are somewhat hidden. Drive by and you might barely notice it, unless you're trying to make your way past the line of cars snaking out onto Santa Monica Boulevard some Saturday night. (More on that later.) Tucked off of a busy stretch a few blocks east of Vine Street, it's easily accessible by bus. Visitors can tour the grounds for free from Monday through Sunday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Hollywood Walk of Fame viewed from above

The Guide to the Hollywood Walk of Fame Ceremony


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The world-famous Hollywood Walk of Fame features more than 2,500 terrazzo and brass stars embedded in the sidewalk along 15 blocks of Hollywood Boulevard and three blocks of Vine Street. The five-pointed stars honor the accomplishments of actors, musicians, directors, producers and others in the entertainment industry.

July 4th Fireworks Spectacular at the Hollywood Bowl

The Hollywood Bowl: The Story of an L.A. Icon


Elina Shatkin

After playing home to concerts, theatrical productions and an Easter Sunrise service, the Hollywood Bowl kicked off its first official season in the summer of 1922. It was a barebones experience for spectators, who sat on temporary wooden benches to watch Alfred Hertz conduct the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The scenery and the sounds, however, were hard to beat. Located in a bowl-shaped area of the Hollywood Hills that was once called Daisy Dell, the spot where the venue now stands was chosen, in part, for its natural acoustics. Those are amplified by electronics as well as the bandshell with its distinctive white arches. It's actually the Hollywood Bowl's fourth bandshell. The first two were designed by Lloyd Wright, son of architect Frank Lloyd Wright.